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General News · 1st July 2017
Wendy
Among Canadian songwriters, one memorable balladeer was the incomparable individualist known as Stompin’ Tom Connors born in Saint John, New Brunswick.
He was a Canadian country and folk icon, always in cowboy hat and boots, who for more than 40 years extolled Canada’s pastoral and working-class virtues in his rugged homespun songs in taverns, concert halls and at festivals all across Canada. Performing his well-known three chord ballads with a floor pounding stomp he was known for his honesty and outspoken patriotism as he railed against a global music industry he felt had betrayed the nation’s character and song treasury.

In 1978 he returned several Juno Awards he had won to protest against Canadian musical artists who sought fame in the U.S. “I feel that the Junos should be for people who are living in Canada, whose main base of business operations is in Canada, who are working toward the recognition of Canadian talent in this country and who are trying to further the export of such talent from this country to the world with a view to proudly showing off what this country can contribute to the world market,” he said at the time.
In his - No Canadian Dream – “Canadian radio, boy is it grand, when you want to hear music from some other land/ They tell us to like and flow with the stream/ we have No Canadian dream.....
It was no longer the case after the CRTC began to regulate the amount of music from ‘other lands’ played on the radio, at last giving Canadian content a foot- hold across the airwaves.

Before he died in 2013 he left a note to his fans: - “Hello friends, I want all my fans, past, present, or future, to know that without you, there would have not been any Stompin’ Tom. It was a long hard bumpy road, but this great country kept me inspired with its beauty, character, and spirit, driving me to keep marching on and devoted to sing about its people and places that make Canada the greatest country in the world."
“I must now pass the torch, to all of you, to help keep the Maple Leaf flying high, and be the Patriot Canada needs now and in the future.”
“I humbly thank you all, one last time, for allowing me in your homes. I hope I continue to bring a little bit of cheer into your lives from the work I have done.”

In 2008 Canada Post issued a stamp in his likeness. Among a long list of tunes he wrote Bud the Spud, The Hockey Song, Sudbury Saturday Night, The Man in the Moon is a Newfie, Unity, and so many more too numerous to list here. After his death his family asked that donations be made to food banks and homeless shelters, In Memory of Stompin’ Tom.

Here’s his tribute to Canada: Canada Day, Up Canada Way

It's Canada Day up Canada way on the first day of July.
And we're shoutin' "hooray" up Canada way, when the maple leaf flies high.
When the silver jets from east to west go streaming through our sky.
We'll be shoutin' "hooray" up Canada way when the great parade goes by.

O Canada, standing tall together!
We raise our hands and hail our flag;
The maple leaf forever!

It's Canada Day up Canada way, on the coast of Labrador.
And we're shoutin' "hooray" up Canada way on the wide Pacific shore.
People everywhere have a song to share on Canada's holiday.
From Pelee Island in the sunny south to the North Pole far away.

O Canada, standing tall together!
We raise our hands and hail our flag;
The maple leaf forever!

It's Canada Day up Canada way, when the long cold winter's done.
And we're shoutin' "hooray" up Canada way for the great days yet to come.
Where maple trees grow maple leaves, when the Northern sun is high.
We're Canadians and we're born again on the first day of July.

O Canada, standing tall together!
We raise our hands and hail our flag;
The maple leaf forever!

It's Canada Day up Canada way, from the lakes to the prairies wide.
And we're shoutin' "hooray" up Canada way on the St. Lawrence river side.
People everywhere have a song to share on Canada's holiday.
From Pelee Island in the sunny south to the North Pole far away.

O Canada, standing tall together!
We raise our hands and hail our flag;
The maple leaf forever!
We raise our hands and hail our flag;
The maple leaf forever!
A True Canadian
Comment by Gary Fast on 1st July 2017
Thanks for this article. Stompin' Tom was a great even if did use just three chords. His songs were memorable and patriotic. A good reminder for our Sesquicentennial Canada Day.