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Guineé
General News · 12th June 2014
Richard Trueman
Here in Tiber Bay, we have a large mixed garden of perennials and vegetables. A prominent feature of this garden is about 45 “Old Garden Roses”. That definition means that the parentage or origin of these roses range from 500 BC to 1955 AD with a lot of them centering around the Napoleonic era and emperoress Josephine who fostered and rewarded gardeners for the hybridization of roses for Europe.

Quickly speaking, the hot climate (Persian or China) rose was crossed, grafted, or combined with some of the cooler climate roses, wild or not, to produce new varieties. If the stock was from China then the new rose would be classified as a Hybrid Tea rose, because tea came from China.

In Josephine’s time these new varieties were named after her friends, famous families and places in France. Examples we have are Glorie de Dijon, Despez a Fluer Jaune, Madame Hardy, La Ville de Bruxelles, Compte de Chambord, Louise Odier, etc. All of these roses remind you of the times and in particular women overdressed with many layers, aka: crinolines. And as the french are noted for the invention of perfume, these roses too are heavily scented from sweet, musky, to fruity.

Another sponsor of roses in modern times was a man called David Austin. In the 1970s and 80s he reproduced many new varieties that were beautiful but mostly scentless. Examples we have: Lillian Austin, Graham Thomas, Abraham Darby.

The pictures:
Lead Picture 01. Guineé, a climbing Hybrid Tea of 1938. double bloom. More than a hundred roses hanging over one of our fences.

Picture 02. Kordesii Climbing Rose, Dortmund. This rose is modern, 1955, single bloom and flowers right into November, noted for its buds, and slight “apple” smell.

Picture 3. Rosa Rubra, from Gaul, wild, 1830. single bloom, picked for its dark foliage, often planted near new buildings to act as an accent.

Picture 4. Cecile Brunner, 1881, climbing, Hybrid Tea, double bloom. Literally a thousand roses blooming and climbing 20 feet high over stump, large rhodo, and clematis mound. PM Elliot Trudeau made this rose famous as a daily buttoneer. Pictured here is the bud he wore before it opens in to a full but small double rose.

Picture 5. Madame Gregoire Staecklin, “Spanish Beauty” a climbing Hybrid Tea, 1927. Prolific with buds that hang down in a “shy fashion”.
Dortmund
Dortmund
Rosa Rubra
Rosa Rubra
Cecile Brunner
Cecile Brunner
Madame Gregoire Staecklin
Madame Gregoire Staecklin